Lemme ask you a question…

When you read something like what’s below, do you feel motivated or do you feel irritated? Myself, I fall into the “irritated” category, and am absolutely not motivated to spend any money with someone who talks down to me like this guy does. That last bit I find especially insulting. When I read this, my reaction wasn’t “Where do I sign up?,” it was more like “F**k you!”

What do you think?

If you were one of the looky-loos who clicked but didn’t take advantage of this exclusive offer…

Click Here now to see what you’re missing.

But if you’re happy spinning your wheels and you don’t really want to own, run or manage your own business then I wish you luck and I hope your current job survives the coming economic meltdown. 

As it turns out, no one has bothered to share the raised-hackles issue with this person, because this is the EXACT SAME TEXT he used to badger people back in December of 2015. Or, possibly, he knows and doesn’t care. Is this the only way he can get business: to bully people? Wow. Oh, wow.

June 15, 2016 Quiz! More excellent material from a globally famous author!

  1. Have you ever heard the common catchphrase, “The little things mean the most?”
  2. As a result you begin to attract even more money – and like that snowball, it grows, adding to your savings.
  3. You see, I’ve been working on this package for over several months now. (The training itself, the accumulated work of decades).
  4. But, but, but — Here’s what my team said…”No so-and-so, lizinsarasota has not enrolled yet.”
  5. If you’ve ever dreamt about joing the top 10% of income earners in your industry…now is your chance to make that dream a reality.
  6. It doesn’t matter if you’re an agent in an office or if you own your own business. What I’m about to share with you can (and has) doubled sales time and time again.
  7. Each module will be delivered to you — once a week over the next 12 weeks. I do this to give you time to breathe, focus on one module at a time — and avoid overwhelm.
  8. This is a lesson I’ve personally used to go from struggling just above the poverty line… to increasing my income TEN TIMES in two years — when I first got started in business.
  9. It is due to those four words: “I already know this”.
  10. Here’s the problem if you say “yes”, but you’re not making the kind of income you want.
  11. It means you DON’T really “know it”.
  12. If you’re reading this, I trust you to be someone who has the courage to be humble — and listen — and learn.
  13. And you’ll recall a time in your life when you though “I already know this”, but was caught off guard by the new insights and experience.
  14. It’s Status Quo.
  15. (Regardless if the team won a championship recently or not).
  16. And this, my friend is where the “BIG TRAP” is whenever I hear a student say, “I already know this.”
  17. I created this program for the sole purpose of getting sales people to double their income in 35 weeks or less… simply by making small incremental “2% changes” each week.
  18. Yes, you should consider my program even if you “think” you know what you’ll learn and discover already.
  19. Here’s where your true “high performer” lesson begins.
  20. Do you know the difference between someone who’s just “earning a living,” vs someone who has “created wealth?”

23-Question Quiz WITH Answers! See horrible writing here!

  1. I share a heartbreaking story about my granddaughter here…(Don’t worry, it’s heartbreaking for the salesperson, not my granddaughter).

Two things. First off, I would use an ellipsis sparingly in my writing, but this guy’s emails are simply stuffed with ellipses. One once in a great while is one thing…too many, and you look wishy washy. So, I’d rephrase and not use the ellipsis. Second thing is that…well, the more I look at this, the less I like it, from a punctuation standpoint. Is that period the last point, making it a 4-point ellipsis with an intervening parenthetical aside? Do we have a 3-point ellipsis and then the parenthetical aside? In that case, the period should be inside the parentheses. Gee, I’m confused. Let’s look at another sentence.

2) Here are the three “sales realities” that are affecting your sales today – – no matter what industry, niche or product you sell.

Why the quotation marks? Quotation marks for expressions should be used very sparingly, and I wouldn’t suggest them in an unremarkable phrase like “sales realities.” Also, what’s with the two hyphens? Plus, I’d stick a comma after “niche.”

3) Quite simply – – information about you, your product, service, reviews, competition… and price… is at the touch of a fingertip these days.

Yuck! This is a mess. I’d write it like this:

Quite simply, information about you—your products, services, reviews, competition, and price—is available at the touch of a fingertip these days.

4) You can make sales without “fighting prospects”.

Periods and commas are always placed inside quotation marks in American English. And since this guy is headquartered in California…

5) However — if you know the “seven key results areas” top performers focus on… and how they practically avoid negotiations and “price wars”…

Yes, this is a fragment. Okay. First thing, no dash after the “however”—use a comma. Second thing. We’ll let him slide with the quotes about “seven key results areas” because it’s part of the specific language of his pitch. But! (Third thing.) We won’t let him slide about the quotes around “price wars.” Fourth thing. No space after an ellipsis inside a sentence. Fifth thing. I hate that ellipsis after “price wars.”

6) What if I were to tell you –you could double your income this year– simply by making small, miniscule changes to the way you do business… in just seven key areas?

Hello! Hello! You’ve just got to run your material through spellcheck, everyone. Since when is minuscule spelled “mini”scule?

Now, the thing about dashes is that you have to be able to take out all the material inside a pair of dashes and have your sentence make sense. If it doesn’t, then you haven’t placed your dashes correctly. This is the same rule whether the parenthetical information is enclosed by a pair of commas or dashes or parentheses: you must be able to remove the parenthetical material and have the sentence make sense. So, my friends, does this sentence make sense without the parenthetical material? No, no it does not.

And that’s not the only problem. “Small” and “minuscule” are virtually identical, so, why, pray, are they used in the same sentence?

Plus, no way should you underline under a dash. Boo!

And, finally, no space after a 3-point ellipsis.

The sentence should read like this:

What if I were to tell you that you could double your income this year simply by making small changes to the way you do business…in just seven key areas?

7) What if I told you — you could be outselling and making more money than all your peers in your industry, niche or office — in just 35 weeks or less?

Again, the dashes here are wrong, wrong, wrong.

Plus, if you can count something, you can’t use “less.” You have to use “fewer.” Here’s the way to remember that rule: Fewer snowflakes, less snow.

8) And in my opinion… millions of sales reps now have obsolete skills. (You may be one of them)!

Whew. Comma after “and.” Comma after “opinion.” And, that exclamation point needs to go inside the parenthesis, not outside. This is piss-poor writing.

9) More big companies are cash rich than ever before – yet are also more reluctant to spend it.

What’s that hyphen doing there? You need a dash. Plus, what does “it” refer to? Sure, the writer means “cash,” but that is not what he or she said. The work-around could be “More big companies have more cash than ever before…” Again, that’s not what is said.

10) This level of “Fear of Spending” may be here for a long time… which unfortunately means there’s no room for ‘average’ salespeople in this economic climate.

Lots to see and comment on in this little gem. Okay, why the quotation marks and capitalization in “Fear of Spending”? The “specialness” of this phrase does not meet the threshold of requiring quotation marks. Then there’s another ellipsis with an incorrect space. Then, why (oh, why!) is “average” in quotes, much less SINGLE QUOTES, which is so, so, so wrong?

11) You see… these top earners use simple but very specific techniques — in what I call the “7 Key Results Areas”.

Mistake #1. Ellipsis with space

Mistake #2. I’ve been looking at that dash for a while…and I can’t decide exactly why I don’t like it, but that’s one of the perils of poor writing…you put your readers’ hackles up, and they just can’t give one questionable punctuation mark a pass. And that, my friends, is a major mistake!

Mistake #3. Hey, people, repeat after me: Commas and periods are always placed inside quotation marks, and there are no exceptions to this rule.

12) It’s like you’ve joined the “Insiders Club” of top sales performers when you fully understand and use the “7 Key Results Areas”

Yuck! Where’s the period? And why is “insiders club” in quotes and capitalized?

13) Can It Really Be That Simple To Join The Ranks Of Six and Seven Figure Earners?

Well, for consistency’s sake, “and” should have been capitalized in this caption, but the main problem is he doesn’t use my favorite rule: the “Suspended Hyphen Rule.” Oh, do I love that rule. Here it is: …Six- and Seven-Figure Earners.

14) In the past 30 days I have improved my sales by 27% percent.

Hmm. Don’t use the % sign in formal writing, and never, ever, follow it by the word “percent.” Very sloppy. Plus, since you have an introductory clause, use a comma after “days”: In the past 30 days, I have improved my sales by 27 percent.

15) The truth is, the 7 Results Areas aren’t “new” or “secrets”.

Why is that comma there? Sheesh. Plus, the phrase “7 Results Areas” appears nowhere else in the text, which is problematic. And, there’s that mistake about quotation marks again!

16) How to figure out exactly what your prospect’s core problem is… and “fit” your product or service to their needs…

“Prospect’s” is a singular possessive noun, so you can’t use the plural possessive “their.” If you keep your noun singular, you’d have to say “his or her needs.” If, however, you changed the sentence to read “your prospects’ core problems are,” you could use “their.” Plus, why is “fit’ in quotation marks? It’s not nearly special enough to be set off with quotes.

17) We’ve already talked about the “3 Sales Realities”.

Well, I’ll give them credit: they are pretty much consistently wrong.

18) Four keys to uncovering “overlooked hot prospects”. (This is the top performer’s secret to getting more “yeses”. He sees what others miss, making selling easier and stress free)!

Why the parentheses? Why can’t you all get that quotation mark rule right? Why is that exclamation mark outside the parenthesis, when it should be inside? Geesh.

19) How to “out-flank” your competition and keep the best prospects for yourself… even if you’re selling the same product for a higher price! (This works even on “price-shoppers”)!

No quotes around “out flank.” No space after the ellipsis. And when you write a stand-alone sentence inside parentheses, then the punctuation goes inside, not outside.

20) Identify the “high success-ratio” prospects with ease. These are people likely to buy and keep on buying. (Now you can leave all the “tough sells” to your competition)

Don’t like those quotation marks, and you need some sort of punctuation (inside the parentheses) in the “Now you can…” sentence.

21) The customer today is extremely skeptical and suspicious. They are terrified of making a bad buying decision, of losing money, of making mistakes.

Noun-pronoun mistake: “the customer” is singular, and “they” is plural.

22) They “perform”.

Again (and again), quotation marks always are placed outside periods and commas.

23) This prevents overwhelm, non-action and procrastination.

Since when is “overwhelm” a noun?

Only an idiot…

Only an idiot sends out emails that trumpet his writing and publishing expertise and then offers to share that expertise with you—for a hefty fee, of course—but doesn’t bother to edit what he writes.

Not only is his writing the subject of my previous blog post, but I thought I’d include this little two-sentence gem, which came in today’s email:

Two decades later, I became a successful author several times over, and a world-renowned professional speaker.

Now, I’ve got the process of successful writing and a publishing down to a science…

Yeah, well, if you say so….

 

23-Question Quiz, With All the Material Taken from a World-Famous Person’s Promotional Email

There’s a very famous motivational person who is constantly trying to get me to buy “packages” or “best-selling” books, or some such wonderful, awesome product from him. If I just buy his products, I’ll be rich beyond the dreams of mortal man. Ha! His writing is so sloppy, though, that there’s NO WAY I’d ever drop a penny with him or his international organization; I don’t care how many millions of people he’s trained. Believe me, I’ve mentioned the repeated mistakes I see in his promotional prose to his team, but, since he doesn’t seem to care, I’m happy as a clam to find entire quizzes in just one email, like this one, instead of searching the internet for a sentence here and a sentence there….Some of these are fragments, so if you find a fragment, the problem is more than the fact that it’s a fragment. No…there’s something more there to discover.

These were just 23 of the—I don’t know because I lost track—dozens and dozens of mistakes in one email. ONE email! How does that happen?

Wow, what a hot mess!

  1. I share a heartbreaking story about my granddaughter here…(Don’t worry, it’s heartbreaking for the salesperson, not my granddaughter).
  2. Here are the three “sales realities” that are affecting your sales today – – no matter what industry, niche or product you sell.
  3. Quite simply – – information about you, your product, service, reviews, competition… and price… is at the touch of a fingertip these days.
  4. You can make sales without “fighting prospects”.
  5. However — if you know the “seven key results areas” top performers focus on… and how they practically avoid negotiations and “price wars”…
  6. What if I were to tell you –you could double your income this year– simply by making small, miniscule changes to the way you do business… in just seven key areas?
  7. What if I told you — you could be outselling and making more money than all your peers in your industry, niche or office — in just 35 weeks or less?
  8. And in my opinion… millions of sales reps now have obsolete skills. (You may be one of them)!
  9. More big companies are cash rich than ever before – yet are also more reluctant to spend it.
  10. This level of “Fear of Spending” may be here for a long time… which unfortunately means there’s no room for ‘average’ salespeople in this economic climate.
  11. You see… these top earners use simple but very specific techniques — in what I call the “7 Key Results Areas”.
  12. It’s like you’ve joined the “Insiders Club” of top sales performers when you fully understand and use the “7 Key Results Areas”
  13. Can It Really Be That Simple To Join The Ranks Of Six and Seven Figure Earners?
  14. In the past 30 days I have improved my sales by 27% percent.
  15. The truth is, the 7 Results Areas aren’t “new” or “secrets”.
  16. How to figure out exactly what your prospect’s core problem is… and “fit” your product or service to their needs…
  17. We’ve already talked about the “3 Sales Realities”.
  18. Four keys to uncovering “overlooked hot prospects”. (This is the top performer’s secret to getting more “yeses”. He sees what others miss, making selling easier and stress free)!
  19. How to “out-flank” your competition and keep the best prospects for yourself… even if you’re selling the same product for a higher price! (This works even on “price-shoppers”)!
  20. Identify the “high success-ratio” prospects with ease. These are people likely to buy and keep on buying. (Now you can leave all the “tough sells” to your competition)
  21. The customer today is extremely skeptical and suspicious. They are terrified of making a bad buying decision, of losing money, of making mistakes.
  22. They “perform”.
  23. This prevents overwhelm, non-action and procrastination.